Oil Pipeline – Storm Field Services LLC http://stormfieldservicesllc.com/ Sun, 17 Oct 2021 10:50:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/storm-field-services-llc-icon-1-150x150.png Oil Pipeline – Storm Field Services LLC http://stormfieldservicesllc.com/ 32 32 Extinction Rebellion blocks entrance to oil company in Ashkelon https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/extinction-rebellion-blocks-entrance-to-oil-company-in-ashkelon/ https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/extinction-rebellion-blocks-entrance-to-oil-company-in-ashkelon/#respond Sun, 17 Oct 2021 10:50:52 +0000 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/extinction-rebellion-blocks-entrance-to-oil-company-in-ashkelon/

Extinction Rebellion activists blocked the entrance to the Europe Asia Pipeline Company complex in Ashkelon on the south coast on Sunday morning, causing traffic jams before they were finally removed from the scene by police.

There was no immediate police announcement of any arrests.

Extinction Rebellion, a global movement, uses nonviolent direct action to try to persuade governments to act on the climate crisis.

Other green organizations deployed banners on road bridges and at intersections across the country over the weekend to protest the EAPC deal and call on the government to do more on climate change.

Activists were protesting a largely unpopular and secret deal signed a year ago by the state-owned company and an Israeli-Emirati consortium to use the first land pipelines to transport Gulf oil from the port of Eilat to the sea. Red, in the south of Israel, towards the Mediterranean port of Ashkelon.

The EAPC has a poor environmental record. Among other things, it was responsible for Israel’s worst environmental disaster when an oil pipeline burst and sent some 5 million liters (1.32 million US gallons) of crude oil to the Evrona Nature Reserve in the Arava Desert in 2014.

Seven years later, the nature of the reserve shows no signs of recovery and its ecosystem could collapse if ways are not found to clean up the soil and allow acacia seeds – which are home to a multitude of species – to start germinating again, according to the findings of a five-year surveillance study published last month.

Opponents of the deal are worried about potential oil leaks into the Gulf of Eilat that could devastate the coral reefs and tourist economy of the city of Eilat. Leaks near Ashkelon would threaten the operation of the main desalination facilities.

It is not clear who, if any, in government saw the details of the MOU.

Widespread opposition from scientists, environmental groups, residents of Eilat and many other cities, as well as environmental protection and energy ministers, has pushed the government to revise the deal, although that little is known about the discussions.

Oil seeps through desert bushes in Evrona Nature Reserve, December 7, 2014 (Environmental Protection Ministry spokesperson / King Talbi)

Meanwhile, in Tel Aviv on Saturday, protesters gathered outside the homes of Environmental Protection Minister Tamar Zandberg and Transport Minister Meirav Michaeli, calling on their ministries to vote against a transport plan on October 19. which, if approved, will pave the way for massive construction. project on Reches Lavan (White Ridge), a pastoral hill with a popular natural spring just west of Jerusalem.

In March, an appeal subcommittee of the National Planning Committee rejected a plan approved in 2020 by the Jerusalem District Planning Committee for the construction of two road tunnels to be constructed at the Ora junction, where four roads existing meet.

The plan for a multi-level transportation system aims to relieve current traffic, allowing for the addition of a light rail line and serving the increased number of passenger cars that will accompany the construction of Reches Lavan and possibly other communities to be built in the Jerusalem Hills in the future.

Artist’s impression of the new Reches Lavan district and the proposed two-speed transport system. (YouTube screenshot)

A two-tier discussion of the issue will take place by the National Planning Committee on Tuesday morning, after which government ministry officials will vote on whether or not to give it the green light.

Opponents see Reches Lavan’s plan as the start of construction on many of Jerusalem’s green hills, which are dotted with natural springs and are an important green lung for the city’s residents.

Much of the development planned for White Ridge is tied to a national program to build 1.5 million homes nationwide by 2040, including 297,000 in the Jerusalem district, to keep pace with population growth.

Most of the units are supposed to come online via city renewal, in which old buildings in the city center are demolished and much taller buildings are constructed in their place.

The Jerusalem district office of the Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel studied 4,000 plans and determined that this goal could be achieved by the capital without digging into the local countryside.

The problem is that replacing slums in disadvantaged neighborhoods with new construction offers limited benefits – and because the government has so far been unwilling to provide financial incentives for developers (in the form of grants, subsidies or tax breaks), it instead offers what it calls “additional ground” on which such developers can make more money.

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Is Enough Being Done to Protect the Trans Alaska Pipeline from Climate Threats? https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/is-enough-being-done-to-protect-the-trans-alaska-pipeline-from-climate-threats/ https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/is-enough-being-done-to-protect-the-trans-alaska-pipeline-from-climate-threats/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 19:39:26 +0000 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/is-enough-being-done-to-protect-the-trans-alaska-pipeline-from-climate-threats/

The Trans-Alaska Pipeline inside Alaska. Source – Gillfoto, CC SA 4.0

The company that maintains the pipeline has started planning for an emergency after heavy flooding in 2019, but some experts fear it may be too little or too late.

In late summer 2019, an unusually heavy downpour hit the Sagavanirktok River in the Brooks Range of northern Alaska. According to Inside Climate News, the August storm ripped 100 feet of land from the west side of the Sag, as the river is commonly known, reaching within 30 feet of a buried segment of the Trans Alaska Pipeline.

The Trans Alaska Pipeline is a four-foot-diameter conduit that transports an average of 20 million gallons of crude oil per day from the Prudhoe Bay oil fields, and if the floodwaters reached a buried section of the pipeline at full power, the force would hit the pipe like waves hitting a sailboat on rough seas.

Ultimately, whether above ground or buried, the floodwaters would have severely damaged the pipeline.

Prudhoe Bay Oil Fields: Aerial view of the British Petroleum (BP) and ARCO oil fields on the North Slope. Image dated 1971. Source – US Fish and Wildlife Service, public domain

“Unlike discharges of hazardous liquids on land where it may be easier to respond to and contain spills, rapid river currents will carry hazardous liquids further downstream, potentially affecting much larger geographic areas and more communities,” the Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, the federal agency responsible for enforcing pipeline safety, pipeline operators said in a 2019 bulletin.

Two months after the flooding, this close call prompted the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, a union of oil companies that owns and operates the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), to seek state permission to fortify the banks of the Sag in order to protect the pipeline. flood waters.

However, recent weather events related to global warming prompted Alyeska to seek permission to build three massive flood control walls along other sections of the river “to protect TAPS from current and future flooding.”

A taste of things to come

Scientists, pipeline consultants and conservationists say it’s time for us to face a future in which infrastructure like the Trans-Alaska Pipeline will experience increasing attacks from global warming, such as the floods, forest fires, thawing permafrost and sea levels rise.

Part of the TAPS, which runs from Prudhoe Bay to Valdez. It’s on SR 4, south of Delta Junction. It’s on a fault line, so this stretch is built to withstand a large earthquake – the pipe can move several feet in any direction without breaking. Source – Malcolm Manners of Lakeland FL, USA, CC SA 2.0.

The Arctic and Alaska are warming twice as fast as the rest of the globe due to global warming. And global warming is thawing permafrost that the oil industry must keep frozen to maintain the infrastructure that allows it to extract more of the fossil fuels that cause warming.

On June 27, Digital Journal reported on a study featured in a May 31 article in The cryosphere, a publication of the European Geosciences Union. Focusing on infrastructure and the pipeline in Alaska, researchers found that roads, bridges, pipelines and other types of infrastructure in Alaska and elsewhere in the Arctic will deteriorate faster than expected due to the inability of planners to consider the impact of structures on adjacent permafrost.

Alyeska is also in the midst of a project dating back to February 2020, to install ground coolers under an elevated segment of the pipeline 57 miles northwest of Fairbanks to stop thawing permafrost that has deformed several of the braces holding the pipeline. This project started in June 2021.

If we include the number of floods that threatened the pipeline – besides the Sag, then we should include the Lowe River, near its terminus in Valdez, eroded its banks in March 2019. Then, in May, 600 miles au north of Valdez, the tumult of the Dietrich River threatened the pipeline along the Dalton Highway near Coldfoot.

According to NBC News, Alyeska spokeswoman Michelle Egan declined to answer specific questions about the flooding that threatened the pipeline or the organization’s overall flood mitigation plan. She said in a statement that the pipeline was built and maintained with consideration of Alaska’s “unique” environment and that Alyeska has an integrity management program that includes a team of engineers specializing in monitoring rivers and flood plains.

Interestingly, the Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, the federal agency responsible for ensuring pipeline safety, acknowledged the recent increase in flooding along the Trans-Alaska Pipeline, but stopped before saying the trend was of concern or required an ordinary response.

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Colombia ELN guerrillas take responsibility for attacks on oil infrastructure https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/colombia-eln-guerrillas-take-responsibility-for-attacks-on-oil-infrastructure/ https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/colombia-eln-guerrillas-take-responsibility-for-attacks-on-oil-infrastructure/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 21:06:00 +0000 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/colombia-eln-guerrillas-take-responsibility-for-attacks-on-oil-infrastructure/ View of the Ecopetrol oil refinery in Barrancabermeja, Colombia on March 1, 2017. REUTERS / Jaime Saldarriaga

BOGOTA, Oct. 15 (Reuters) – Left-wing National Liberation Army (ELN) guerrillas in Colombia claimed responsibility for Friday morning’s attack on an oil pipeline used to transport crude to the country’s largest refinery, located in the town of Barrancabermeja.

The attack resulted in an oil spill that affected surrounding vegetation and soil, the company said in a statement. A spokesperson said a fire that broke out was then brought under control.

In a statement posted on one of its websites, the ELN said: “Our guerrilla forces have committed an act of sabotage on the La Cira Infantas pipeline used by Ecopetrol today October 15 in the Paquistan region on the road between Barrancabermeja and Bucaramanga. “

The group also took responsibility for the attacks on the La Cira Infantas oil field in September, which resulted in production from some wells being stopped.

The La Cira Infantas oil field produces around 30,000 barrels of crude per day. Production was not halted at any of the wells after Friday’s attack, a spokesperson for Ecopetrol (ECO.CN) said.

Ecopetrol, Colombia’s largest company, owns 52% of the field, while the remaining 48% is owned by SierraCol Energy.

The ELN said it wanted to “open a debate” on the use of the country’s resources, particularly oil. He said he would be ready to discuss stopping his attacks on oil infrastructure in exchange for removing road tolls and adjusting fuel costs.

Attacks on oil pipelines and other infrastructure in Colombia are common, with 28 such incidents recorded from 2021 to September. In 2020, Ecopetrol recorded 51 attacks on oil infrastructure.

“Ecopetrol rejects violent actions by third parties against the pipeline,” the company said in a statement.

Peace talks between the ELN – which was founded by radical Catholic priests in 1964 – and the Colombian government were frozen after a rebel bombing killed 22 student police officers in 2019.

Reporting by Oliver Griffin Editing by Paul Simao and Rosalba O’Brien

Our Standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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US Reports $ 590 Million Ransomware Payments in H1 2021 | World news https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/us-reports-590-million-ransomware-payments-in-h1-2021-world-news/ https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/us-reports-590-million-ransomware-payments-in-h1-2021-world-news/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 15:57:01 +0000 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/us-reports-590-million-ransomware-payments-in-h1-2021-world-news/ According to the US Treasury Department report, the figure is 42% higher than the amount reported for all of 2020, which comes as costly and debilitating attacks have increased.

Financial institutions reported $ 590 million in ransomware-related payments to U.S. authorities in the first half of 2021, setting a pace to beat the previous decade combined as cyber extortion explodes, a report revealed on Friday.

According to the US Treasury Department report, the figure is 42% higher than the amount reported for all of 2020, which comes as costly and debilitating attacks have increased.

“If current trends continue, (reports) filed in 2021 are expected to have a higher ransomware transaction value than (reports) filed in the previous 10 years combined,” the Treasury said.

The attacks consist of breaking into an entity’s networks to encrypt its data, and then demanding a ransom, usually paid via cryptocurrency in exchange for the digital key to unlock it.

Washington has sought to quell a sharp rise in attacks, including imposing its first sanctions against an online exchange where illicit operators allegedly traded cryptocurrencies for cash.

Recent attacks on a major US pipeline, a meat packing company, and the Microsoft Exchange email system have drawn attention to the vulnerability of US infrastructure to digital hackers.

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For towns along Line 3, pipeline workers brought a welcome boom – while it lasted https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/for-towns-along-line-3-pipeline-workers-brought-a-welcome-boom-while-it-lasted/ https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/for-towns-along-line-3-pipeline-workers-brought-a-welcome-boom-while-it-lasted/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/for-towns-along-line-3-pipeline-workers-brought-a-welcome-boom-while-it-lasted/

After a rather extraordinary year, life in the small town of Backus is back to normal.

On a recent weekday the main street in town was quiet. A few cars were parked in front of the post office and around the corner of the meat market.

In the kitchen of the Corner Store and Restaurant on Highway 371, cooks fill plates with fried eggs and hash browns for a handful of diners.

It’s a very different scene from earlier this year, at the height of Line 3 pipeline construction, when hundreds of pipeline workers lived and worked in the area.

Corner Store owner Dave Sheley said they would start showing up at his convenience store at 5 a.m. to stock up on food for the workday.

“Sometimes people would line up to the cooler,” he recalls.

Sheley had to open earlier and add staff to help with the morning rush. He installed a second coffee maker and a heated display case for the sandwiches.

Keeping up with the rush was a challenge, Sheley said. But after two pandemic-related restaurant closures, he said pipeline workers were a “godsend” that came just at the right time.

“It was sometimes hard for us,” he said. “But in general it was like, ‘Oh, thank you.’ Because we would have really suffered there for a while without it. “

Now that Line 3 is in service and most of the pipeline workers are gone, Sheley said he has reduced staffing and food orders – and expectations for the future.

“You look at our sales this year. … We are not going to expect that this coming year, ”he said. “Anyone who thinks he will, I think, is probably a little misguided. “

The entrance to the town of Backus. A large assembly area on the outskirts of town served as a hub for workers, pipes, trucks, and equipment, and at times the increased activity caused traffic jams in town.

Kirsti Marohn | MPR News

No more traffic jams

For the past year or so, this small Cass County town of around 250 residents was a hub for the Line 3 project. A staging area on the outskirts of town buzzed daily with trucks, laborers and workers. ‘equipment.

All this activity sometimes caused traffic jams in the quiet streets of Backus. It also gave local businesses a boost, as all of those workers stayed in motels, ate in restaurants, and stocked up on supplies at local hardware stores.

At the peak of construction, more than 4,000 workers were involved in the Line 3 project. About 700 workers remain, Enbridge spokesperson Juli Kellner said. The pipeline began operating on October 1.

This short-term explosion in activity is normal for a pipeline project, said Louis Johnston, professor of economics at St. Benedict’s College and the University of St. John’s.

During construction, local communities see a wide variety of benefits, Johnston said, including work crews spending their money in town and buying the supplies they need.

“Once it’s built, it just transports crude oil through an area,” he said. “Unless there is maintenance to be done, the local area will not notice its effects.”

Enbridge said communities along the Line 3 corridor will benefit from millions of dollars in increased property tax revenues.

The Canadian company has also invested in community and non-profit initiatives, totaling $ 1.4 million last year, as well as an additional $ 3 million in grants for environmental restoration efforts. and habitat in the area, Kellner said.

While the large influx of Line 3 workers may be over, the timing of it – right after the COVID-related shutdown – may have saved some struggling businesses, said Mike Paulus, executive director. of the nonprofit Cass County Economic Development Corp.

“We may never know how many businesses were on the verge of going out of business after a historically difficult time and were rescued,” said Paulus.

‘As part of your family was leaving’

It’s not just restaurants that have seen an increase in business. Line 3 workers frequently came to B&L Automotive in downtown Backus for oil changes and repairs on their personal and business vehicles, co-owner LeAnne Pollock said.

After construction of the pipeline ended a few weeks ago, most of these workers have left town, leaving a steady stream of local customers.

“They kept us busy. They were great people,” Pollock said. “It was sad to see them all leave.”

At the Backus Locker, a butcher and meat processing store, co-owner Janis Schmid would lay out beef jerky on a tray to load into the smokehouse. Schmid said his retail store has seen an increase in the number of Line 3 customers, as have other local businesses.

A person prepares beef jerky for smoking.

Backus Locker co-owner Janis Schmid prepares beef jerky for smoking. Schmid says their retail store saw an increase in meat sales as Line 3 pipeline workers were in the area, and that it also employed two women who were the wives or girlfriends of the workers in the pipeline.

Kirsti Marohn | MPR News

“It was a great way to get by after the pandemic,” Schmid said. ” Because the [were] people around and they were buying local produce in their areas where they worked so that helped everyone.

Schmid said she and her husband David were already working six days a week, so it was difficult to extend their hours to accommodate the schedules of pipeline workers.

She said they hired two women – a wife and girlfriend of pipeline workers – who were looking for work. They left when the project was completed, Schmid said.

“It’s like part of your family is leaving,” she said.

The temporary nature of the surge did not surprise most residents of Backus, said Blair Ecker, pastor of Pine Mountain Gospel Church. It is located in the old primary school of the city, with a Christian school and a thrift store.

A person stands in a doorway.

Blair Ecker, pastor of the Pine Mountain Gospel Church, said the increase in pipeline workers in Backus, Minnesota was mostly positive, although it put a strain on rental housing.

Kirsti Marohn | MPR News

“It was totally expected,” he said. “It was going to be a boom while they were here, and then they were leaving.”

With stories of oil towns in North Dakota in mind, Ecker said he was a little worried that so many pipeline workers were flocking to Quiet Backus.

But for the most part, Ecker said the influx of workers was a positive experience. They were friendly and didn’t cause any problems, he said. A project manager regularly attended Ecker church with his wife, until last week.

“We always teased them saying that they would end up becoming residents of Backus,” Ecker said with a laugh. “They did not do it.”

Financial gains and housing challenges

Ecker said some city residents have secured temporary jobs on the Line 3 project, either working on the pipeline itself or in supporting roles, such as security or as COVID testers. 19.

And his church indirectly benefited from Line 3: A few parishioners who owned property along the pipeline corridor profited by leasing it to Enbridge. They donated more money to the church, which was able to pay off its construction debt.

But Ecker said that aside from some local business owners, most people here weren’t really affected financially by Line 3.

“Individually, I haven’t seen an influx of personal income with the pipeline being here. And I think I’m the majority of Backus residents. ” he said. “I was happy for those who did.”

Line 3 posed some challenges, Ecker said. The influx of large numbers of workers looking for housing has put a strain on rental housing in Backus, where poverty and housing insecurity are already problems.

It was also controversial and the target of protests from environmental activists, Native American tribes and others opposed to the project.

A few of these protests took place in Backus, sparking increased law enforcement activity and curious interest from residents, Ecker said.

“It was a traffic jam every time there was a protest – whenever someone chained to something – because everyone wanted to see,” he said.

In a log cabin office in a corner of downtown Backus, real estate agent Mark Tietjen got a close look at the activity created by the Line 3 project.

“At all hours of the day, it was this constant flow of traffic,” said Tietjen, office manager at Rusty’s Up North Realty.

The flood of workers needed housing, and Tietjen said he had received hundreds of calls from people looking for housing to rent.

“I’m surprised they all found rentals,” he said. “It’s such a small town, but somehow they made it.”

Some local residents have rented their lakeside cabins or extra rooms to pipeline workers – not just in Backus, but other nearby communities such as Hackensack, Pine River, and Walker.

Tietjen only received one call from a worker who wanted to buy a house. But he hopes some of the workers may have liked the woods and lakes region so much that they will one day come back and buy a house or a cabin.

There is another trend that could have a longer economic impact on the region. Since COVID-19, more and more people are moving north to homes or cabins and working remotely, Tietjen said.

Unlike pipeline workers who move on to the next job, these newcomers seem to be here to stay.

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Professor Highlights Indigenous Peoples’ ‘Resistance to Pipelines’ – The Daily Evergreen https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/professor-highlights-indigenous-peoples-resistance-to-pipelines-the-daily-evergreen/ https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/professor-highlights-indigenous-peoples-resistance-to-pipelines-the-daily-evergreen/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:03:03 +0000 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/professor-highlights-indigenous-peoples-resistance-to-pipelines-the-daily-evergreen/

WSU professor leads conference on Indigenous activism, emphasizes historical context to find modern solutions

WITH THE AUTHORIZATION OF SHANE BALKOWITSCH

“Elders Addressing the Crowd” by Shane Balkowitsch. Wet collodion photo of the Dakota Access Pipeline protest site, taken in 2016 near Cannonball, North Dakota.

October 14, Clif Stratton, Associate Professor of History at WSU, will present “Protest Energy: Pipeline Resistance and the Lessons of History”. The conference will focus on the struggle of indigenous activists against climate change around the world, in particular resistance to the expansion of oil pipelines.

The event starts at 7:00 p.m. and participants can attend either in person at the Kenworthy Performing Arts Center in downtown Moscow or by visiting the historical society of the company website. This is the second lecture in an ongoing series presented by the Latah County Historical Society titled “How It Goes, How It Started”.

Stratton said he had a solid background in the history of protests by indigenous groups, as he developed a book for History 105 on the role of carbon energy in our global political history.

Stratton was invited to give the talk by Dulce Kersting-Lark, executive director of the Latah County Historical Society. The conference is part of an ongoing series of conferences that will focus on how historical context plays a vital role in finding solutions to our most pressing problems.

“[The lecture series] allows myself, but also other authors, to take their work out of the classroom and talk with the public about some of the issues that WSU students are learning, ”Stratton said.

Kersting-Lark said the historical society’s mission is to help people see the connection between local, national and world history. She said climate change had absolutely affected Pullman. Agriculture is a big industry in the local area, so the weather impacts the local economy.

Stratton said he became interested in climate change and climatic manifestations while studying political science and history as a student. He became fascinated by the climate crisis: how it has had disproportionate impacts on some populations and how environmental problems reflect greater historical inequalities.

Through his speech and the book, Stratton said he hopes to provide a perspective that goes beyond portraying climate change as unresolvable. He wants to show that people have made a real impact in the past by making their voices heard.

Stratton will address ongoing protests in northern Minnesota, where Indigenous groups are protesting construction of the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline. The pipeline could cause damage to the Mississippi River springs the tribes depend on, threatening Indigenous culture .

Police have arrested more than 900 protesters opposing Line 3 and its impact on the climate and indigenous rights, according to the Pipeline Legal Action Network.

“There has been some success among indigenous groups, in the United States and Canada, in terms of shutting down pipeline projects for long enough for investors to walk away,” Stratton said. “Like when they don’t become profitable, there have been success stories where they actually got governments to cancel pipeline licenses.”

Political pressure is forcing government leaders to take action on climate change, Stratton said. More famously, Barack Obama canceled the Keystone XL pipeline and President Joe Biden canceled the Dakota Access Pipeline. There is pressure on Biden to cancel the Line 3 pipeline, which will be discussed in the interview.

While it’s often touted that building pipelines creates well-paying jobs, Stratton says it doesn’t. Although there are a handful of jobs required to operate the pipeline, the majority of pipeline operations are independent of human intervention.

He said that while the pipeline will create temporary jobs, the economic benefits are not as extensive as some politicians would have you believe. Ultimately, there is very little economic gain for the local pipeline companies.

Stratton will also address global protest efforts. He will discuss the history of Shell Oil Company in Nigeria’s Niger River Delta and the resistance of the Ogoni, a fishing community whose water sources have been polluted by Shell.

Stratton said successful resistance takes time, persistence and a commitment to the cause. Protest sometimes requires the ultimate sacrifice, and some climate protesters have died in their resistance to the oil expansion.

Stratton said those protesting the pipelines are often the groups most affected by the expansion and protesting is not futile. He said it will take a lot of action at the local level to have an impact in the fight against climate change.

“Most of the time when you get an article from NPR, there’s not a lot of conceptualization,” Kersting-Lark said. “They just don’t have the space in history to give a really solid understanding of the last 100, 200 or 500 years of history. But we don’t exist in a vacuum.

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Costa Mesa bait shop files oil spill complaint https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/costa-mesa-bait-shop-files-oil-spill-complaint/ https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/costa-mesa-bait-shop-files-oil-spill-complaint/#respond Wed, 13 Oct 2021 00:45:00 +0000 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/costa-mesa-bait-shop-files-oil-spill-complaint/

SANTA ANA, Calif. (CNS) – A Costa Mesa bait and fishing tackle store has filed a proposed class action lawsuit against pipeline company Amplify Energy Corp. on behalf of Orange County businesses seeking damages related to the oil spill, it was announced Tuesday. .


What would you like to know

  • Ketcham Tackle claims that it derives more than 90% of its income from fishing gear and gear used for saltwater fishing in the Pacific Ocean.
  • Plaintiffs seek class certification and judgment against Amplify Energy for economic damage
  • They are also seeking punitive and / or exemplary damages, the creation of a fund to monitor the environment and economics of marine habitat in the affected area and other remedies that the court or jury may decide. required
  • A message seeking comment from an Amplify Energy representative was not immediately responded to

Ketcham Tackle claims that it derives more than 90% of its income from tackle and fishing gear used for saltwater fishing in the Pacific Ocean. The store dresses many sport fishing boats that operate out of Orange County, and those boats and other customers depend on access to clean sea water – but can no longer fish in the polluted area, according to the complaint filed Monday in Santa Ana. federal court.

Ketcham’s setback is a “direct and foreseeable” consequence of Amplify Energy’s wrongful acts and / or omissions, according to the lawsuit.

A message seeking comment from an Amplify Energy representative was not immediately responded to.

“The Orange County oil spill is an environmental and economic tragedy that is devastating for many people and businesses who depend on the region’s beautiful coastline for their livelihood and recreation,” said plaintiffs lawyer Steven Williams.

“The defendants have a long history of violations and failing to meet industry standards, and their inexcusable delay in reporting and dealing with the October 2 spill has made matters worse,” the lawyer said. “They must be held accountable. We are grateful for the opportunity to help Ketcham and a proposed class achieve economic and injunctive relief during this dire time for coastal residents of Orange County.”

According to reports, more than 50 ships were waiting to dock in San Pedro Bay at the time of the spill, Williams said. He alleged that such a backlog resulted in larger ships being anchored closer to pipelines, internet cables and other dangers due to a lack of space.

Preliminary reports indicate that the ruptured pipeline that leaked oil may have been caused by the anchor of a passing ship that snagged the pipeline, causing a partial tear, the suit says.

The Coast Guard’s senior investigator into the spill said last week the ruptured submarine pipeline may have been damaged several months to a year ago, adding that it is not known when the crack occurred. or when oil has started to seep into the water.

The plaintiffs allege that despite knowledge of the possibility of such an event during port congestion, Houston-based Amplify Energy did not reasonably inspect the affected pipeline, “which carries ultra-hazardous materials and was seriously damaged. damaged at the time of the contaminating breach. “

Williams alleged that the defendants knew the region’s ports were beset with lengthy safeguards, but failed to implement the proper procedures to protect against the increased risk of pipeline damage and failed to conduct any effective regular inspections.

The applicants seek collective certification and judgment against Amplify Energy for economic damage, punitive and / or exemplary damage, creation of a fund to monitor the environment and economics of marine habitat in the affected area and other repairs that the court or jury may deem necessary.

Other proposed class actions have been filed by property and business owners in Orange County.

Although the spill was not reported until 9 a.m. on October 2, some people reported smelling oil in the water the night before.

As cleanup continued on Tuesday and other beaches in Orange County reopened, state officials announced several inquiries into the cause of the oil spill.

State Attorney General Rob Bonta and US Senator Alex Padilla visited the site and received a briefing from US Coast Guard officials on Monday before Bonta announced that his office was investigating the leak to determine if any action civil or criminal is justified.

Authorities initially estimated that up to 144,000 gallons of oil may have leaked from the damaged pipeline, but officials later said the actual amount was likely much lower, though there is still no precise figure.

At a press conference Thursday afternoon, USCG Captain Rebecca Ore estimated that about 588 barrels of oil had spilled, which would equate to about 24,700 gallons. This is considered a minimum amount of leakage, with authorities estimating a maximum potential of around 130,000 gallons.

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Saudi Aramco asks banks for $ 12 billion to $ 14 billion pipeline loan – sources https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/saudi-aramco-asks-banks-for-12-billion-to-14-billion-pipeline-loan-sources/ https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/saudi-aramco-asks-banks-for-12-billion-to-14-billion-pipeline-loan-sources/#respond Mon, 11 Oct 2021 09:18:00 +0000 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/saudi-aramco-asks-banks-for-12-billion-to-14-billion-pipeline-loan-sources/ The Saudi Aramco logo is pictured at the Abqaiq oil facility in Saudi Arabia on October 12, 2019. REUTERS / Maxim Shemetov

DUBAI, Oct.11 (Reuters) – Saudi Aramco (2222.SE) has asked banks to set up a loan expected to be between $ 12 billion and $ 14 billion that it plans to offer to buyers of its gas pipeline network , sources said. the oil giant is advancing plans to raise funds through asset sales.

Aramco could raise at least $ 17 billion from the sale of a significant minority stake in its pipelines, sources told Reuters. Participation would be offered with a financial loan package already in place, worth around 80% of the price.

Banks that funded the $ 12.4 billion acquisition of the company’s pipelines earlier this year received a request for proposals from Aramco last week, three sources familiar with the matter said.

The deal, which included all of Aramco’s existing and future stabilized crude pipelines, was backed by $ 10.5 billion in funding from a large group of banks including Citi, HSBC and JPMorgan.

Aramco did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the new pipeline financing. He is working with JPMorgan (JPM.N) and Goldman Sachs (GS.N) on the gas pipeline deal, sources said. Read more

Reuters reported in August that companies that were in talks for Aramco’s gas pipeline assets include Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP), Brookfield, Singapore sovereign wealth fund GIC, European gas infrastructure owner and operator SNAM, as well as the Chinese Silk Road, the Chinese state. the backed investment fund CNIC Corp, the South Korean sovereign wealth fund Korean Investment Corp (KIC) and NH Investment & Securities.

Potential buyers are expected to submit bids in late October, one of the sources said.

Earlier this year, Aramco, similar to Abu Dhabi National Oil Co (ADNOC), used a sale-leaseback agreement to sell a 49% stake in the new company Aramco Oil Pipelines Co to the buyer and rights to 25 years of tariff payments for transported oil. its pipes.

It plans to use a similar structure for its gas pipelines.

Editing by Peter Graff

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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California pipeline leak: more questions than answers https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/california-pipeline-leak-more-questions-than-answers/ https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/california-pipeline-leak-more-questions-than-answers/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/california-pipeline-leak-more-questions-than-answers/

MATTHEW BROWN, MICHAEL R. BLOOD and STEFANIE DAZIO / Associated Press

Investigators looking for the cause of an underwater pipeline rupture off the southern California coast have pointed to the possibility that a ship’s anchor dragged the line on the seabed and cracked it. , but two videos released so far only provide tantalizing clues as to what could have happened. under the surface of the ocean.

A Coast Guard video released Thursday appears to show a trench in the seabed leading to a bend in the submerged line, but experts have offered varying opinions on the meaning of the short, grainy shots. An earlier video revealed a thin 13-inch-long break in the line. The pipe showed no evidence of damage that experts said would be expected from a collision with a multi-ton anchor from freighters that regularly move in the area off the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

The slight bend in the line shown in a video “doesn’t necessarily look like anchor damage,” Frank G. Adams, president of Houston-based Interface Consulting International, said in an email. When a pipeline is struck by an anchor or other heavy object “it usually results in physical damage which can lead to fracture.”

Ramanan Krishnamoorti, professor of petroleum engineering at the University of Houston, said he viewed the video running along a bend in the line as “revealing.”

“It looks to me like you have something that got dragged through the sand that could have impacted the pipeline,” he said. However, he remained puzzled that the leak was from a crack and not a larger gash, assuming it had been hit by an anchor or other object.

Reports of a possible spill off Huntington Beach were first published Friday evening, but the leak was not discovered until Saturday morning. Although the size of the spill is not known, the Coast Guard on Thursday revised the parameters of the estimates slightly to at least about 25,000 gallons and no more than 132,000 gallons.

The Coast Guard said about 5,500 gallons of crude had been recovered from the ocean. The oil spread southeast along the coast with reports of small amounts landing in San Diego County, about 50 miles from the original site.

So far, the impact on the wildfires has been minimal – 10 birds dead and 25 others recovered alive and treated – but conservationists warn that the long-term impacts could be much greater. As the cleanup continued on the shore, some beaches in Laguna Beach reopened on Friday, though the public still couldn’t get in the water.

Key questions remain: Could the line have been hit several days before the start of the leak? Which vessel is responsible? And if a ship’s anchor isn’t the culprit, what else could it be? Investigators, meanwhile, continued to investigate the cause of the rupture, as well as to determine what happened in the crucial first hours after the first reports of a possible oil spill.

The narrow gash seen in a video could explain why signs of an oil slick were seen on Friday evening, but the spill escaped detection by the pipeline operator for more than 12 hours.

“My experience suggests this would be a damn difficult leak to determine remotely quickly,” said Richard Kuprewicz, a private pipeline accident investigator and consultant. “An opening like this, on a 17-mile-long underwater pipe, is very difficult to spot by indications from a distance. These crack-like releases are weaker and can last for some time. “

When pipes fail catastrophically, the breach is usually much larger, what is referred to in the industry as a “fish mouth” rupture because it is gaping like a fish’s mouth. -he declares.

Amplify Energy, a Houston-based company that owns and operates three offshore oil platforms and the pipeline south of Los Angeles, said it did not know there had been a spill until its employees detect an oil burst on the water at 8:09 a.m. on Saturday. a m

The Coast Guard said Thursday it was investigating the incident with other agencies as a “major marine accident” due to the potential involvement of a vessel and damage exceeding $ 500,000. He said they will determine whether criminal charges, civil penalties or new laws or regulations are needed.

The leak occurred about 5 miles offshore at a depth of about 98 feet, investigators said. A 4,000-foot section of the pipeline was dislodged 105 feet, bent like a bowstring, Amplify CEO Martyn Willsher said.

Jonathan Stewart, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles, said he was surprised the damage wasn’t more severe given the distance the pipe was moved.

“My first reaction when I heard it has been out of place so far is that it’s remarkable it’s even intact at all,” said Stewart.

Moving a large section of pipe up to 105 feet would have caused “flexural strains” – tension on the side that was stretched in a semicircle, with compression on the other, as it was bent inward, Stewart said.

It’s possible that such pressure alone could lead to a rupture, although Stewart said there was too little information to draw a conclusion about the cause. It is possible that a sharp anchor section could pierce the pipeline, but “you could still suffer damage just from the bending.”

“Because it pulls on the pipe, you create these bending stresses in the pipe, which could eventually become large enough to break it,” he said.

Questions remain as to when the oil company knew it had a problem and delays in reporting the spill.

A foreign vessel anchored in the waters off Huntington Beach reported to the Coast Guard that it saw a shard of more than 2 miles just after 6 p.m. on October 1 and that evening, an Agency satellite image space also indicated a probable oil spill. , which was reported to the Coast Guard at 2:06 a.m. Saturday, after being examined by a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration analyst.

Federal pipeline safety regulators set the time of the incident at 2:30 a.m. on Saturday, but said the company did not shut down the pipeline until 6:01 a.m. – more than three hours after the outbreak of ” a low pressure alarm indicating a possible problem. – and did not report the leak to the Coast Guard until 9:07 am Federal and state rules require immediate notification of spills.

Amplify said the line had already been shut down at 6 a.m., then restarted for five minutes for a “meter reading” and closed again. A meter reading shows the amount of oil entering and leaving the line. The company could have used this information to confirm whether the pressure change alarm went off because the pipe was leaking, Krishnamoorti and Kuprewicz said.

The company said a boat discovered oil on the water at 8:09 a.m.

Willsher, who answered questions alongside the Coast Guard and other officials for four days, did not appear at Thursday’s press conference. Other officials refused to explain his absence.

Brian Melley contributed from Los Angeles.

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California Oil Pipeline Leak: More Questions Than Answers | News, Sports, Jobs https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/california-oil-pipeline-leak-more-questions-than-answers-news-sports-jobs/ https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/california-oil-pipeline-leak-more-questions-than-answers-news-sports-jobs/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 04:20:13 +0000 https://stormfieldservicesllc.com/california-oil-pipeline-leak-more-questions-than-answers-news-sports-jobs/

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. (AP) – Investigators looking for the cause of a ruptured submarine pipeline off the southern California coast have highlighted the possibility that a ship anchor dragged the line on the seabed and cracked it, but two videos have been posted so far that only provide tantalizing clues as to what might have happened beneath the ocean’s surface.

A Coast Guard video released Thursday appears to show a trench in the seabed leading to a bend in the submerged line, but experts have offered varying opinions on the meaning of the short, grainy shots. An earlier video revealed a thin 13-inch-long break in the line. The pipe showed no evidence of damage that experts said would be expected from a collision with a multi-ton anchor from freighters that regularly move in the area off the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

The slight arc in the line shown in a video “Does not necessarily look like anchor damage”, Frank G. Adams, president of Houston-based Interface Consulting International, said in an email. When a pipeline is struck by an anchor or other heavy object “Which usually results in physical damage that can lead to a fracture.”

Ramanan Krishnamoorti, professor of petroleum engineering at the University of Houston, said he viewed the video running along a bend in the line “developer.”

“It looks to me like you have something that was dragged through the sand that could have impacted the pipeline”, he said. However, he remained puzzled that the leak was from a crack and not a larger gash, assuming it was hit by an anchor or other object.

Reports of a possible spill off Huntington Beach were first published on Friday evening, but the leak was not discovered until Saturday morning. Although the size of the spill is not known, the Coast Guard revised the parameters slightly on Thursday from estimates to at least about 25,000 gallons (95,000 liters) and no more than 132,000 gallons (500,000 liters).

The Coast Guard said about 5,500 gallons (20,819 liters) of crude was recovered from the ocean. The oil spread southeast along the coast with reports of small amounts landing in San Diego County, about 50 miles from the original site.

So far, the impact on the wildfires has been minimal – 10 birds dead and 25 others recovered alive and treated – but conservationists warn that the long-term impacts could be much greater. As the cleanup continued on the shore, some beaches in Laguna Beach reopened on Friday, although the public still couldn’t get in the water.

Key questions remain: Could the line have been hit several days before the start of the leak? Which vessel is responsible? And if a ship’s anchor isn’t the culprit, what else could it be? Investigators, meanwhile, continued to investigate the cause of the rupture, as well as to determine what happened in the crucial first hours after the first reports of a possible oil spill.

The narrow gash seen in a video could explain why signs of an oil slick were seen on Friday evening, but the spill escaped detection by the pipeline operator for more than 12 hours.

“My experience suggests that this would be a damn difficult leak to determine quickly from a distance,” said Richard Kuprewicz, a private investigator and consultant on pipeline accidents. “An opening like this, on a 17-mile-long underwater pipe, is very difficult to spot by indications from a distance. These crack-like releases are weaker and can last for some time. “

When pipes fail catastrophically, the breach is usually much larger, which is referred to in the industry as a “fish mouth” breaking because it’s as big as a fish’s mouth, he says.

Amplify Energy, a Houston-based company that owns and operates three offshore oil rigs and the pipeline south of Los Angeles, said it did not know there had been a spill until its employees detect an oil burst on the water at 8:09 a.m. on Saturday. a m

The Coast Guard said Thursday it was investigating the incident with other agencies as “Major sea accident” due to the potential involvement of a vessel and damage exceeding $ 500,000. He said they will determine whether criminal charges, civil penalties or new laws or regulations are needed.

The leak occurred about 5 miles offshore at a depth of about 98 feet, investigators said. A 4,000-foot section of the pipeline was dislodged 105 feet, bent like a bowstring, Amplify CEO Martyn Willsher said.

Jonathan Stewart, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles, said he was surprised the damage wasn’t more severe given the distance the pipe was moved.

“My first reaction when I heard that it was out of place so far is that it is remarkable that it is even intact at all”, said Stewart.

Moving a large section of pipe up to 105 feet (32 meters) would have caused “bending deformations” – tension on the side that was stretched in a semicircle, with compression on the other, as it was bent inward, Stewart said.

It’s possible that such pressure alone could lead to a rupture, although Stewart said there was too little information to draw a conclusion about the cause. It is possible that a sharp anchor section could pierce the pipeline, but “You could still have damage just from the bending.”

“Because it pulls on the pipe, you create these bending stresses in the pipe, which could eventually become large enough to break it.” he said.

Questions remain as to when the oil company knew it had a problem and delays in reporting the spill.

A foreign vessel anchored in the waters off Huntington Beach reported to the Coast Guard that it saw a burst of more than 2 miles just after 6 p.m. on October 1 and that evening, an Agency satellite image Space also indicated a probable oil slick, which was reported to the Coast Guard at 2:06 a.m. Saturday, after being examined by an analyst with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Federal pipeline safety regulators set the time of the incident at 2:30 a.m. on Saturday, but said the company did not shut down the pipeline until 6:01 a.m. – more than three hours after the outbreak of ” a low pressure alarm indicating a possible problem. – and did not report the leak to the Coast Guard until 9:07 am Federal and state rules require immediate notification of spills.

Amplify said the line had already been shut down at 6 a.m. and then restarted for five minutes for a ” meter reading “ and closed again. A meter reading shows the amount of oil entering and leaving the line. The company could have used this information to confirm whether the pressure change alarm went off because the pipe was leaking, Krishnamoorti and Kuprewicz said.

The company said a boat discovered oil on the water at 8:09 a.m.

Willsher, who answered questions alongside the Coast Guard and other officials for four days, did not appear at Thursday’s press conference. Other officials refused to explain his absence.

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